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How Many Solar Panels Do I Need For 2000 kWh Per Month?

Producing 2,000 kWh of electricity per Month is a hefty amount, especially if you’re considering using solar panels. However, with the proper setup, it’s entirely achievable. The number of solar panels you’ll need depends on factors like panel size, location, and other considerations. Let’s break it down and help you how to choose the exact number of solar panels required for your 2,000 kWh per month target.

Now, let’s consider a typical scenario: using a 300W solar panel in an area with six sun peak hours. By calculating the monthly output of one standard solar panel, we can determine how many panels are needed to reach 2,000 kWh.

Here’s a simple breakdown:

A 300W panel generates 0.3 kWh every peak sun hour. In a location with six peak sun hours, this amounts to 1.8 kWh per day and 54 kWh per Month.

Considering solar panel losses (around 25% due to conversions, batteries, etc.), the panel effectively produces 40.5 kWh per Month.

To Find Out How Many Panels You Need For 2,000 Kwh Monthly:

How Many Solar Panels Do I Need For 2000 kWh Per Month

Number Of Panels = 2,000 kWh/month ÷ 40.5 kWh/month = 49.38 Panels

So, you’ll need approximately 50 of these 300W solar panels to generate 2,000 kWh of electricity each Month.

Keep in mind that your situation may differ. You might choose panels with different wattage, or your location might provide less than six peak sun hours. In such cases, you can use our calculator to fine-tune the panel sizes and peak sun hours, giving you the precise number of solar panels needed to meet your 2,000 kWh/month goal.

Number Of Solar Panels Needed For 2,000 kWh Per Month in Different States of the US

State

Required System size (kW) to produce 2000 kWh per month

Required number of residential solar panels (rated at 330W) to produce 2000 kWh per month

Estimated Cost (Before Tax Credit)

Alabama (Montgomery)

13.75 kW

42

$33,700

Alaska (Juneau)

31.2 kW

95

$75,000

Arizona (Phoenix)

11.3 kW

35

$27,500

Arkansas (Little Rock)

14.3 kW

44

$43,700

California (Sacramento)

12.5 kW

38

$35,700

Colorado (Denver)

13 kW

40

$44,700

Connecticut (Hartford)

16 kW

49

$51,500

Delaware (Dover)

15 kW

46

$41,200

Florida (Tallahassee)

13.8 kW

42

$35,600

Georgia (Atlanta)

14.3 kW

44

$45,700

Hawaii (Honolulu)

12.7 kW

39

$33,900

Idaho (Boise)

14.3 kW

44

$41,900

Illinois (Springfield)

15.4 kW

47

$48,600

Indiana (Indianapolis)

15.9 kW

49

$57,700

Iowa (Des Moines)

15.5 kW

47

$53,400

Kansas (Topeka)

14.5 kW

44

$34,600

Kentucky (Frankfort)

15.7 kW

48

$36,700

Louisiana (Baton Rouge)

13.8 kW

42

$43,700

Maine (Augusta)

16.3 kW

50

$56,200

Maryland (Annapolis)

15 kW

46

$46,900

Massachusetts (Boston)

15.7 kW

48

$55,500

Michigan (Lansing)

16.7 kW

51

$63,100

Minnesota (Minneapolis)

16.2 kW

49

$55,800

Mississippi (Jackson)

14 kW

43

$36,900

Missouri (Jefferson City)

15 kW

46

$42,700

Montana (Montana City)

15.7 kW

48

$37,900

Nebraska (Lincoln)

14.5 kW

44

$41,000

Nevada (Carson City)

12 kW

37

$31,200

New Hampshire (Concord)

16.25 kW

50

$58,600

New Jersey (Trenton)

15.4 kW

47

$45,400

New Mexico (Santa Fe)

11.8 kW

36

$40,000

New York (New York)

16.5 kW

50

$57,400

North Carolina (Raleigh)

14.3 kW

44

$43,400

North Dakota (Bismarck)

15.5 kW

47

$37,500

Ohio (Columbus)

16.1 kW

49

$47,900

Oklahoma (Oklahoma City)

13.4 kW

41

$35,100

Oregon (Salem)

17.3 kW

53

$54,100

Pennsylvania (Harrisburg)

15.8 kW

48

$48,300

Rhode Island (Providence)

15.75 kW

48

$56,800

South Carolina (Columbia)

14 kW

43

$40,400

South Dakota (Pierre)

15 kW

46

$35,800

Tennessee (Nashville)

15.3 kW

47

$45,400

Texas (Austin)

13.75 kW

42

$38,000

Utah (Salt Lake City)

13.75 kW

42

$36,900

Vermont (Montpelier)

17.2 kW

53

$54,000

Virginia (Richmond)

15 kW

46

$45,600a

Washington (Washington)

15.1 kW

46

$49,000

West Virginia (Charleston)

16 kW

49

$46,700

Wisconsin (Madison)

16.25 kW

50

$55,400

Wyoming (Cheyenne)

13.8 kW

42

$35,400

Kindly be aware that the figures in the table pertain to a specific city within each state and do not encompass the entire state. Distinct regions within the same state may necessitate varying system sizes to generate equivalent energy amounts.

Extending the illustration to California, let’s consider a residence in California. To achieve an annual average of 2000 kWh per month, this household would require a 12.5 kW solar system, which translates to about 38 solar panels, each rated at 330 Watts.

Conclusion

The information shows that when the sun is more powerful, indicated by higher peak sun hours, and individual solar panels are more efficient, you’ll require fewer panels to generate 2,000 kWh per month. Contact Solar Earth Inc for residential and commercail solar installation.

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